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SELLING ART TO HAPPY CLIENTS WORLDWIDE SINCE 2011. SELLING ART TO HAPPY CLIENTS WORLDWIDE SINCE 2011.

Kris Lamorena | Man Sleeping 1

£200.00

Man Sleeping 1 | Kris Lamorena (b. 1977, Tarlac, Philippines)

60cm x 84cm (23” x 33”) Archival pigment print on Hahnemuele Fine Art Photo Rag paper

Edition of 10

About the artist

Kris Lamorena (b. 1977, Tarlac, Philippines) is a figurative artist who lives and works in London. She works in a diverse number of painting mediums including acrylic, oils, ink and watercolour. Her latest series of works - created during lockdown - are miniature portraits created in acrylic paint. 

Kris' family moved to the UK when she was in her early teens.  She studied art and went on to gain a degree in furniture and product design.  For over a decade she worked as a visual merchandiser designing window displays & installations for fashion brands within the UK & Europe. During the last economic recession she was prompted to make some changes in her career path and the one certainty was that she needed to return to making her own art.  She has then slowly but surely built her practice and developed her style as an artist.   Four years ago she had her first solo show in Studio 73 Gallery in Brixton, London where she has been a regular participant in group exhibitions as well as at the OXO Tower and Islington Arts Factory.  Her work sells regularly to collectors in the UK, Europe, USA & Asia.

Artist Statement

When I am painting a figure, it is not so much an attempt to create a perfect likeness but rather to capture an essence of their character. Most of my paintings are not of any particular person. They are more abstracted so that the features are more reminiscent of a memory or a feeling, than one particular person. I often have a starting point from images I find online: for example, on Instagram, and in films. Sometimes I am inspired by people I see around me in everyday life. Through the process of adding and deducting paint, the figure then evolves to become ambiguous, a lot of times androgynous. This is also why I don’t name the portraits.  The impression is then left for the viewer as to who and what they see and feel.

One thing that ties them all together for me is that I am invested in portraying a lone figure often in a state of introspection, of melancholy stillness and contemplation. Devoid of noise and clutter. It stems from my attempt to understand the complexities of humanity as a whole & my place in it.